Jan 242013
 

It’s official: Polyamory: Married & Dating has been renewed for a second season!

The popular Showtime reality docu-series, which followed one triad and one quad, concluded its first season last August. After that, the stars of the show made the media rounds, appearing on Dr. Drew, The Ricki Lake Show, and as experts in various online articles.

In October, show producer and director Natalia Garcia put out a call for new applications, although the second season was yet to be confirmed. Now it has been!

It’s still unknown whether the new season will include any of the previous participants. It should be interesting to see how it goes.

Jan 102013
 

PQ MonthlyThe December/January issue of PQ Monthly, a print and online publication for the LGBTQ communities of Oregon and SW Washington, featured an article called “Ethical sluttery: Poly relationships expand the reach of love and sex.”

The writer interviews two couples: Kyra Fey, a dominant-leaning switch, and her partner Earthquake; and Rachael Palmer and Devon Chase; plus a single guy named Jake who is dating around.

While Jake doesn’t think his parents could wrap their minds around polyamory, Rachael decided it was important to share that part of her life with her family, for the sake of her partners and simply to clear the air.

“I think for people who don’t know much about polyamory it is easy to assume that my primary and I are having problems and that’s why we are sleeping with other people, when in actuality it’s the opposite,” Rachael says. “We fuck other people because we want to be together for a long time and indulging our fantasies and desires keeps us happy and healthy.”

Read the rest of the article at PQ Monthly. The full interview with Rachael and Devon can be found here.

Jan 072013
 

Fast Forward WeeklyFast Forward Weekly is a progressive newspaper distributed to 1,300 coffee shops, restaurants, stores, and other locations around Calgary, Alberta. A couple weeks ago, a story on polyamory made it to the cover, along with the words “POLYAMORY IS NORMAL.”

The article, entitled “It takes more than two,” profiles several poly folks from Calgary and includes a few quotes from a Calgary sexologist.

Grant Shiels, a man in a triad, shares an analogy about the abundance of love within open relationships:

Making room on his calendar for three people is a challenge, Shiels acknowledges, but he disputes the common argument that, love being a finite commodity, polyamorous people will inevitably get less of it from their partners. Finding the time for his partners may be difficult, but finding the love isn’t.

“Sometimes I use the analogy of, if I were to have only one child, that would be great, I would love that child unconditionally and unreservedly — but if I had three or four children, would that change anything? In fact, I would say I’m blessed even more for having that much love and dynamic in my life.”

Read the rest at Fast Forward Weekly.

Jan 022013
 

Robert McGareyThe University of Texas at Austin’s student magazine, Orange, recently featured a profile of Robert McGarey, an openly poly man who founded The Human Potential Center in Austin in 1986.

While studying for his master’s degree in humanistic and transpersonal psychology, McGarey faced difficulty explaining his ideal relationship structure to girlfriends. He spent a few years working for a computer firm, but felt he was destined for something more.

After a dream spurred him to move to Austin, he founded The Human Potential Center, a non-profit organization focused on helping people become more empowered, loving, and “vibrantly alive.” The organization hosts movie nights, meditation sessions, potluck dinners, and more.

McGarey recalled a particularly moving memory he had from a recent outing hosted for poly individuals, where they asked everyone to map their intertwining relationships on a large sheet of butcher paper. “It looked like spaghetti all over the page, but then you realize that, in most cases, these are all loving, honest and committed relationships,” McGarey says. “And to me, that’s beautiful.”

McGarey lives in Austin with his three long-term “sweeties.”

Read the rest at Orange.

Dec 132012
 

Sierra Black, a poly woman who has been on 20/20 and writes articles on non-monogamy, has penned a new and useful piece called “How To Bring Your Boyfriend Home For The Holidays — When You’re Polyamorous.”

Black has previously opted not to bring a boyfriend to Thanksgiving in order to keep the peace, but she has some excellent pointers for those wanting to share their multiple partners with the family:

Above all, remember that you’re going to a lot of effort to spend time with these people — all these people, your parents and your partners — because you love them. You want them to connect with each other. Look for the comfort zone between your partners and your parents, just as you would with one partner. Don’t expect them to fit perfectly together, but find the points of overlap and focus on those. Does everyone love Chinese food? Maybe skip the traditional meal and order take-out. Universal fondness for board games? Bring some and cut the conversation short in favor of a few rounds of Dixit.

Read the rest at the Huffington Post. (Polyamory Weekly also did a podcast last year on this topic.)

Dec 102012
 

Four researchers are looking for participants in an online survey for non-monogamous and potentially non-monogamous folks. The survey explains:

This survey is the beginning of an ongoing research effort to gain information about the community of individuals who engage in consensual, nonexclusive intimate relationships, or who are philosophically open to doing so, regardless of their current relationship configuration. We undertake this effort in order to better understand this community, its beliefs, practices, and desires, as well as its position within the larger mosaic of humanity.

With knowledge comes the ability to better serve this community, to better represent its interests in the public discourse, and to foster understanding, acceptance and nondiscrimination in the broader sphere. We deeply appreciate your willingness to share your information in furtherance of this important pursuit.

The results of this survey will be used by the researchers to write and publish academic articles and dissertations, in the hope of raising awareness in the scientific community about non-monogamy. One researcher is also writing a book.

The survey should take 35 to 60 minutes to complete, and researchers ask that you answer the questions in one sitting. Answers will remain confidential, with no individually identifying information collected. Take the survey here.

You can follow the progress of the study on its Facebook page.

Nov 212012
 

Jessica Burde of Polyamory on Purpose is in the midst of an IndieGoGo campaign to fund a book she’s writing, the Polyamory on Purpose Guide to Pregnancy, which she plans to release in mid-March. With almost 10 years of polyamory and some pregnancies under her belt, she is uniquely qualified to dispense advice on the subject. And the subject is in dire need of an in-depth guide. Burde explains,

Pregnancy is a big deal for anyone, but there is a whole cultural and medical template to see monogamous couples through the challenges it creates. For poly-folk, pregnancy creates many challenges that monogamous couples never need to confront, from the unexpected pregnancy when you can’t be sure who the bio-father is, to deciding if everyone in your polycule will be raising the child together. There are legal hoops, medical hassles, and relationship issues challenges every polycule will need to confront when someone in the polycule becomes pregnant.

. . . I want to create the guide that I wish I’d had during my pregnancies. I want to create a something that is a concise and complete guide to pregnancy in a polyamorous relationship, so that the information is out there for future poly-parents.

The funds gathered during the IndieGoGo campaign will pay for an editor and publishing expenses. This is a flexible funding campaign, so Burde will receive all money contributed by Monday, December 10th at 11:59 p.m. Pacific, even if it falls short of her $700 goal.

Contributor perks include a copy of the ebook, a signed paperback copy of the book, mentions in the book’s acknowledgements, and a subscription to all future Polyamory on Purpose guides.

Burde asks that if you don’t have the financial means to contribute, help spread the word about the campaign via social media, poly forums, and local meet-ups. If you do have the means, contribute now!

Nov 162012
 

How does one find childrens’ books and media that do not follow the stereotype of “happily ever after” monogamy? Technogeisha wrote a post at Life on the Swingset about her struggle educating her children about alternative relationship models:

We have been trying to keep the standard narrative driven drivel to a minimum since the birth of our first. It was easier in the early years then the real challenge began in preschool. The other little girls had been fed a non-stop diet of “Someday my prince will come.” which our daughter decided to embrace wholeheartedly. A couple of years later a similar thing would happen to our son.

Once they entered school, gender roles were assigned and adhered to. So was the notion of dyadic relationships with the inevitable “first comes love, then comes marriage, the comes the baby in the baby carriage.”  It wasn’t enough to tell them this wasn’t the only option in life. I needed backup. I needed to come up with resources that go against the standard narrative and offer positive views on non-traditional families and relationships. It was difficult to find but I found a few alternatives.

Although it can be hard to find books, TV shows, and movies featuring non-traditional (and especially non-monogamous) families, Technogeisha rounds up some great suggestions. She first recommends books focused on LGBT families, then lists a few with subtle poly themes, such as Else-Marie and Her Seven Little DaddiesSix Dinner Sid, and the story “The Little House That Ran Away from Home” from Strange Stories for Strange Kids.

She also mentions some books for young adult readers, books with themes of self-acceptance and favoritism, and a few movies and TV shows.

Read the whole post at Life on the Swingset.

Nov 132012
 

Victoria Hsu, lawyer and president of the Taiwan Alliance to Promote Civil Partnership Rights (TAPCPR), is collecting signatures on a proposal for new Taiwan marriage laws that would allow both same-sex marriages and legal protections for multiple-person relationships.

The multiple-person family portion of the proposed law would adapt the existing law, which Hsu considers “out of date” and “patriarchal,” since it is rooted in the practice of concubinage.

The petition has almost 30,000 signatures so far, and Hsu hopes to acquire one million by the end of 2013.

If Hsu’s law is adopted by the government, Taiwain would be the first country in Asia to legalize same-sex marriage — and one of the first countries in the world with a multiple-person family law.

Nov 082012
 

In the fall 2012 issue of their newsletter, The Kinsey Institute announced that the archival episodes of Cunning Minx’s Polyamory Weekly podcast has now been added to their Kenneth R. Haslam Collection on Polyamory.

Founded in 1947, The Kinsey Institute at Indiana University promotes interdisciplinary research and scholarship in the fields of human sexuality, gender, and reproduction. The Kenneth R. Haslam Collection, developed by Dr. Haslam in order to further public and academic understanding of polyamory, contains a wealth of materials, including books, conference materials, research articles, newsletters, archives of web-based discussion groups, and more.

With over 340 episodes to date, Cunning Minx has been hosting and producing the Polyamory Weekly podcast since 2005. It is, indeed, becoming a historic bit of polyamory-focused media.